Posted 12 minutes ago

Originally, I was in ‘Hide and Q.’ I had maybe two or three lines, but I was written out for budgetary reasons…They never explain where Deanna Troi is during those episodes because they can’t. So, they just ignore it. I don’t think that works.

If you have a regular character, you must sit down and work out what you’re going to do with her. I think that’s going to happen more this next season. The first season, they had created this character and then dug a hole with the whole empathy thing, a hole they couldn’t get out of. So, if I didn’t have much to do in an episode, they would just totally write me out.

…They had dug that hole for themselves with me being an empath. And in November, I nearly fell into it and was covered over. Without going into that, I nearly got fired.

Marina Sirtis in Starlog, August 1988.

In Marina’s Season 1 interviews with Starlog she seemed almost unrealistically enthusiastic about the possibilities for Troi, so this was a huge change and does bring it more in line with how she talked about the problems with her character later. In this one she does talk optimistically about Season 2 and says that Gene Roddenberry assured her her character would develop more. Although Troi clearly does develop, she still gets left out of the occasional episode with no apparent reason or explanation except either they wanted to save money or couldn’t figure out how to work her in (e.g. “The Perfect Mate”).

Posted 3 hours ago

Review: Star Trek Gender Swap Comics “Parallel Lives”

macpye:

trekkiefeminist:

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Flashback to this January when IDW’s Trek comic series released two issues with a gender-swapped reboot crew. At the time I was cautiously optimistic and now I’ve finally managed to read it for myself.

When fans gender-swap characters, at its best it helps challenge our preconceptions about our favourite characters. It makes us ask, “Why couldn’t character x be a woman?” (or a man or androgynous). Or “Why does y trait have to be seen as feminine/masculine?”.

But it can go wrong. Sometimes gender swapping just ends up reinforcing stereotypes, as in the reverse patriarchy we see in the episode "Angel One", or the classic Trek spoof by Carol Burnett (It pains me to say anything remotely negative about Carol Burnett but the sketch relies heavily on stereotypes and makes it look like putting women in charge of the Enterprise would be a hilarious disaster).

I’m really pleased to say the “Parallel Lives” comics did not have this problem. The characters on Jane Kirk’s Enterprise are pretty much the characters we’re familiar with, possessing the same traits in different bodies.

Though there are some differences.

Spoilers ahead.

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The very thing I’ve always, always hated about genderswapping, and the thing that makes it even triggering for me, is the fact that it’s always from cis male to cis female (or cis female to cis male, to a lesser extent). The total disregard and erasure of anything not within cisnormativity is so, so enormously toxic and vile, that even when it’s used to make a valid point, it makes my bile rise.

Thanks for stating that more clearly and explicitly than I did. I think that’s a key difference between gender-swapping and gender-bending. “Swap” by its very definition means to “exchange one thing for another”, so there’s an inherent tension in that we’re invited to open our minds, but not too much, not beyond a system where all people are born into one of two genders and naturally remain that way.

It’s telling that we get to see cis gender swapping mass-marketed, but the franchise has never seen fit to put forward major, recurring trans or gender-variant characters (Please correct me if I’m wrong in regards to the comics and novels - would love to check out examples if they are there!). 

Posted 4 hours ago

cosmic-llin:

glitteratiglue:

daughterofthefifthhouseyo:

This scene kills me because my inner dork can’t let go of how he is obviously feeling her pain (look at his face, you don’t have to be an empath to have empathy) and she doesn’t know because she can’t sense him gah.

It’s a beautiful scene. I love the way their relationship was portrayed in this episode. At one point he seems almost on the verge of tears; both actors really sell the emotion of the scene. Although I like it even more when he challenges her; he won’t just let her wallow in self-pity, because their relationship is so close and he knows her well enough to not just tell her what she wants to hear. He knows very well that she has an advantage over others, more than she lets on to most people, and wasn’t about to let her take the easy way out. THIS is why they are so perfect together, and the even though most episodes downplay their relationship, this is one that shows that they really are soulmates, and that it was always going to come down to the two of them in the end.

I don’t know, I find this scene troublesome. There’s a lot I love about it but those few lines of dialogue really upset me. I mean, he’s right to say that they’re “equal” now in the sense that she no longer has an ability that he and the others don’t - but I think this is unnecessarily blunt considering how lost she’s feeling. They’re all accustomed to navigating the world without empathic abilities, she isn’t, so it’s actually not equal at all. (I think he’s right that she finds the extra control and safety helpful, but he could have put it a lot more kindly.)

The bit that really gets me though is this line: “To be honest, I’d always though there was something a little too aristocratic about your Betazoid heritage. As if your human side wasn’t quite good enough for you.” IN WHAT WORLD is this an ok thing to say to somebody? Especially when they’re already upset? Deanna can’t help the fact that she was raised on Betazed mostly by her Betazoid mother, and insulting her heritage (especially when he doesn’t share it) is not appropriate behaviour, EVER.

I appreciate what they were trying to do with this scene and I really enjoy the performances, but those two lines in particular made it really not work for me. I wish they had written it even a little differently.

Love this discussion. I remember really liking this episode, and like the folks above I really love the emotion in this scene, but have trouble with the dialogue. I wouldn’t take it nearly so well if I experienced a loss like this and someone said, “I always thought you needed to be taken down a peg or two.” 

(Source: dark-alice-lilith)

Posted 14 hours ago

Tasha and Ripley are both bright women who have risen to a position of authority and who are not easily intimidated. There are also some differences. From what we know of Ripley, her background was more secure. Tasha’s childhood was more aggressive, primitive and survival-oriented. You would almost expect Ripley to wind up in the position she’s in. In the case of Tasha, it’s like a street kid who has finally made good.

…Most of what people have seen of Tasha seems to have centered around this image of her as a butch little tank. In that sense, it does a disservice to the character. Tasha has quite a few sides to her. There’s the all-business side, the side that’s professionally together and physically strong. But there’s also the emotionally insecure side that has missed out on love and friendship and is basically having to deal with people who she believes are superior to her. Tasha definitely has a tender side to her, but make no mistake, she is more than capable of doing her job.

Denise Crosby in the May 1988 issue of Starlog.
Posted 22 hours ago

Voyager 1.13 Cathexis

pixiedane:

Subtitle Another day, another nebula (is everything a metaphor?)

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These photo recap/reviews are awesome, and this one mentions the feminist politics of Janeway’s holonovel, as well as the horribleness of the early Neelix/Kes relationship. 

Posted 1 day ago

Interview with Gates McFadden in the February 1988 issue of Starlog. Did she ever wear that cap-eyepiece thingy on the show?

A couple highlights from the interview:

On Crusher vs. McCoy:

"There’s the obvious difference in that I’m a woman and a mother. But I believe the two characters have much in common. Dr. McCoy is a down-home kind of guy but who has a great deal of common sense. Dr. Crusher is the same way."
On her input into the props:
"I’ve been lucky in that there has been a great spirit of collaboration between the people handling the props and myself. We’re constantly brainstorming about how things should be done medically in the 24th century. Where we’ve had the time, we’ve actually sat down and devised specific functions for the things I use on the show."
On Crusher’s importance (although I’m pretty sure Data’s actually third in command - maybe that changed from the initial series conception):
"Crusher is third in command behind Picard and Riker and with good reason. She is intelligent, strong and quite committed to the mission of the Enterprise. Beverly holds a powerful position on the ship even though you don’t see her on the bridge. She is the only one who can declare Picard and Riker unfit for command. Crusher has many facets that take the character beyond just the ship’s doctor giving injections and performing blood tests. She is a rich and detailed character whom I look forward to fleshing out as the series continues.”
In response to the interviewer arguing the women characters on TNG are more complex than the men so far (mid Season 1):
"That’s an interesting way to look at it. I don’t know if it’s actually the case. They may show more of the emotional side than the men, but I don’t think they’re more complex. If they are, it’s because Gene and the writers are taking great pains to make the series realistic in terms of what women will be doing and saying in the 24th century. Women on this show obviously have more responsibility and if that makes them more complex and interesting to viewers, that’s fine with me."
Posted 1 day ago

Review: Star Trek Gender Swap Comics “Parallel Lives”

image

Flashback to this January when IDW’s Trek comic series released two issues with a gender-swapped reboot crew. At the time I was cautiously optimistic and now I’ve finally managed to read it for myself.

When fans gender-swap characters, at its best it helps challenge our preconceptions about our favourite characters. It makes us ask, “Why couldn’t character x be a woman?” (or a man or androgynous). Or “Why does y trait have to be seen as feminine/masculine?”.

But it can go wrong. Sometimes gender swapping just ends up reinforcing stereotypes, as in the reverse patriarchy we see in the episode "Angel One", or the classic Trek spoof by Carol Burnett (It pains me to say anything remotely negative about Carol Burnett but the sketch relies heavily on stereotypes and makes it look like putting women in charge of the Enterprise would be a hilarious disaster).

I’m really pleased to say the “Parallel Lives” comics did not have this problem. The characters on Jane Kirk’s Enterprise are pretty much the characters we’re familiar with, possessing the same traits in different bodies.

Though there are some differences.

Spoilers ahead.

Read More

Posted 1 day ago

My new “Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations” tattoo. I know I’m not the first person to do this Vulcan calligraphy tattoo, and I hope I’m not the last - I think IDIC is one of the most important messages of Star Trek.

Posted 2 days ago

'I carry the big guns,' says Denise Crosby, who describes her character in The Next Generation as a 'Sigourney Weaver type.' Crosby…explains that Tasha is the ultimate fighting machine, trained in all forms of weaponry and defense.

'My body is my weapon,' chuckles Crosby before continuing a more serious assessment. 'But there is more to Tasha than merely a fighting machine. Tasha is a woman with problems. She has been brought up on a ghetto planet in a very aggressive society but she is also a very insecure person, especially when she is around people whom she continues superior to her.'

…McFadden, who plays Chief Medical Officer Dr. Beverly Crusher, claims that the series will reflect the times.

'This is the ’80s and, because of that, the series will explore stronger, more relevant relationships and attitudes.' McFadden, an accomplished stage actress and director, points out that women on the current Star Trek series will come across as more than cuties in Starfleet jumpsuits.

'We have seen it in the scripts. All the roles for women are intelligent and strong…One thing is certain, the women in this show are not token characters. Their roles are legitimate and substantial.'

From the November 1987 Starlog article “Star Trek: The Next Generation: New Adventures in the 24th Century”.
Posted 3 days ago
From the October 1987 issue of Starlog, reporting on a Star Trek cruise weekend in the Bahamas. The entire article is so bonkers that I suggest you head over to the Internet Archive and read the whole thing.
Trust me. It includes things like Nichelle Nichols and Majel Barrett judging a “Mr. Legs” sexy legs contest, DeForest Kelley playing a joke on Dr. Ruth, Robin Curtis making fun of herself as Saavik, Grace Lee Whitney singing her own Trek filk music, and more.

From the October 1987 issue of Starlog, reporting on a Star Trek cruise weekend in the Bahamas. The entire article is so bonkers that I suggest you head over to the Internet Archive and read the whole thing.

Trust me. It includes things like Nichelle Nichols and Majel Barrett judging a “Mr. Legs” sexy legs contest, DeForest Kelley playing a joke on Dr. Ruth, Robin Curtis making fun of herself as Saavik, Grace Lee Whitney singing her own Trek filk music, and more.